Melrose Police Department Reminds Residents about Dangers of Hot Cars in Summertime after Incident Thursday

6a015393f55fc9970b017d41137d32970c-800wi

Melrose Police Department
Michael L. Lyle, Chief
56 W. Foster St.
Melrose, MA 02176

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Melrose Police Department Reminds Residents about Dangers of Hot Cars in Summertime after Incident Thursday

*This story has been updated to reflect that it was a nanny, not the child’s mother, who left a toddler inside a vehicle.*

MELROSE — As temperatures rise, Chief Michael L. Lyle and the Melrose Police Department are reminding residents of the dangers associated with leaving a child or pet in a hot car. Chief Lyle observed the dangers himself today, after a child was accidentally left in a car, and he was the first officer on scene Thursday.

Melrose Police responded to Slayton Road near the Mount Hood Golf Course Playground at 12:47 p.m. Thursday after a nanny reported to police that she closed the door and accidentally left the keys in the console with the toddler she was watching locked inside the car.

After just a few minutes, the nanny reported that the child had gone from smiling and laughing to crying as temperatures rose quickly inside the vehicle. Melrose Police, Fire and Stephens Automotive Transport arrived quickly, and the child was freed within one minute of their arrival. The child was in the locked car for less than 10 minutes. The toddler was cooled off and evaluated by EMS but was able to return home.

“The story ended well in this case, and the officers, firefighters and tow operator did an outstanding job, but today showed just how quickly conditions change inside a vehicle,” Chief Lyle said. “I know accidents happen, but I hope all residents will read and appreciate these important safety tips and never intentionally leave a child or a pet inside a hot car.”

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 42 children died from vehicular heatstroke in 2017 — a staggering 63 percent increase from 2015.

Heatstroke occurs when a person’s core body temperature rises to 104 degrees Fahrenheit. A temperature of 107 degrees can result in irreversible organ damage or death. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, young children’s bodies heat up three to five times faster than an adult’s, putting them at higher risk.

Temperatures inside a car can rise 20 degrees in a matter of 10 minutes. Even on a 60-degree day, temperatures inside a car can reach 110 degrees, and on a hot day, they can get to 125 degrees in minutes.

The majority of deaths occur when a parent or caregiver forgets a child in a car.

Chief Lyle recommends that residents follow several important safety tips from the NHTSA:

  • Always check the back seats of your vehicle before your lock it and walk away.
  • Keep a stuffed animal or other memento in your child’s car seat when it’s empty, and move it to the front seat as a visual reminder when your child is in the back seat.
  • If someone else is driving your child, or your daily routine has been altered, always check to make sure your child has arrived safely to his/her destination.
  • Have your daycare provider call you if your child doesn’t arrive.
  • If you see a child left in a car, take action immediately. Do not wait for the driver to return or assume that they will be back soon. If the child appears to be in distress, attempt to get them out of the car immediately, even it means breaking a window, and dial 911.

Pets should also not be left in cars. According to the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, pets suffer needlessly when left in hot cars, even on moderately warm days. Such actions can result not only in harm to your pet but also fines and possible prison time for pet owners.

###




Melrose Police Chief Speaks to Seniors about Missing Persons Program

6a015393f55fc9970b017d41137d32970c-800wi

Melrose Police Department
Michael L. Lyle, Chief
56 W. Foster St.
Melrose, MA 02176

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Melrose Police Chief Speaks to Seniors about Missing Persons Program

MELROSE — Police Chief Michael L. Lyle made a special visit to a local senior living home last week to inform residents and staff about the city’s missing persons program.

On June 14, Chief Lyle stopped by The Residence at Melrose Station, 158 Essex St., to give an overview of the Melrose Alert program, which was created by the police department in conjunction with the Council on Aging. The Melrose program was created after Chief Lyle recognized the need to increase the amount of time police have to search for a missing person and streamline the process for gathering information about individuals who have become lost or wander.

Melrose Alert enhances the state’s Silver Alert program at the local level, and is designed to pre-plan a rapid response to locate cognitively impaired residents, like those with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, who are at risk of wandering and becoming lost. This group of people must be treated as high-risk and police must respond as such.

The Melrose Alert program works by collecting vital information in a secured law enforcement database about the person, including any locations they are known to visit frequently and a current photograph. This information can then be used to enhance officers’ ability to locate loved ones who go missing, especially during the all-important first minutes and hours.

“Timing is critical when a loved one goes missing. Seconds can be the difference for this high risk group,” Chief Lyle said. “Often times it is hours before police receive a call that a person is missing, so with the Melrose Alert program, when a call comes in, we will already have the important information we need and can immediately begin looking for that person.”

All 15 residents who attended the presentation at The Residence at Melrose Station received an application to sign up for the Melrose Alert program. Residents who have a loved one that they would like to sign up for the program can do so here.

###




Melrose Schools Orchestra Director Named Director of the Year

Melrose Public Schools
Superintendent Cyndy S. Taymore
360 Lynn Fells Parkway
Melrose , MA 02176

For Immediate Release

Friday, June 8, 2018

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Melrose Schools Orchestra Director Named Massachusetts Director of the Year 

Melrose Schools Orchestra Director Luke Miller, seen here assisting a young student with the violin, has been named the state's Orchestra Director of the Year. (Courtesy Photo/Melrose Symphony Orchestra)
Melrose Schools Orchestra Director Luke Miller, seen here assisting a young student with the violin, has been named the state’s Orchestra Director of the Year. (Courtesy Photo/Melrose Symphony Orchestra)

MELROSE — Superintendent Cyndy S. Taymore and Director of Global Education Kimberly Talbot, are very excited to announce that Melrose Schools Orchestra Director Luke Miller has been named the state’s Orchestra Director of the Year.

After being anonymously nominated by another professional in the field — and fellow member of American String Teachers Association (ASTA) — the entire ASTA body voted Miller the best candidate for the 2018 Massachusetts Orchestra Director of the Year.

Miller was chosen for his outstanding leadership of the Melrose High, Middle, and Elementary school orchestras.

“We are so proud of Luke and all that he has achieved as Orchestra Director,”  Superintendent Taymore said. “He has a real gift for teaching, and his love of music inspires students to pursue their interests in different instruments.”

The award was presented at the final Massachusetts ASTA meeting of the year, which was held on Tuesday, June 5.

Miller directs Melrose Middle and High school orchestras. He also serves as one of the Elementary school string specialists, helping foster a love of organized ensemble music early on among students in the Melrose Public Schools. He is also actively involved with music education at the state level. He volunteers as a member on the executive board of the Massachusetts Music Educators Association, Northeastern District. He is also currently the assistant festival coordinator for the MMEA-ND Senior District Festival. In the past, Miller has served as the Orchestra Manager for the MMEA-ND Junior District Festival, MMEA-ND Senior District Festival, as well as the Massachusetts All State Festival. For the past 5 years, he has been a guest conductor at the March String Fest, held in Billerica each spring. He is regularly collaborating with other music teachers from around the state, working to provide the best possible musical experience for our students.

Melrose Middle and High schools regularly compete at the Massachusetts Instrumental and Choral Conductors Association festival under Miller’s teaching. Many of his students have earned spots in the district orchestra. Some students also play in the Melrose Symphony Orchestra. Miller has most recently led the entire string program in Melrose through a two-year Composer in Residence project to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the Melrose Symphony Orchestra.

Miller is a violinist and currently performs with the Melrose Symphony Orchestra, and on occasion, with other local community orchestras. Throughout the summer, he works as a faculty member at various music camps including the University of New Hampshire’s Summer Youth Music School, the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s Days in the Arts, and the String Music Festival at Endicott College. He is also a staff member of the New England Ambassadors of Music program.

Miller has been with the district since August, 2012 and is an invaluable member of the Melrose School community.

“Luke Miller is an inspired educator who fosters a love of music in our students from a very early age,” Talbot said. “We have seen, first-hand, the benefits of a strong investment in musical education and how it creates stronger, more invested students. The Melrose community is very lucky to have a treasure like Luke.”

###




Melrose’s Winthrop School Has the Most Inspiring Bathrooms

Melrose Public Schools
Superintendent Cyndy S. Taymore
360 Lynn Fells Parkway
Melrose , MA 02176

For Immediate Release

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Winthrop Elementary School Bathroom Improvements Project Adds Empowering Messages of Kindness to the Usual Lavatory

MELROSE — Inspirational, motivational, artistic, empowering — words not commonly associated with a bathroom in an elementary school.

This weekend, a group of parents and student volunteers at Melrose’s Winthrop Elementary School set out to change that.

With the help of parent and student volunteers, the school’s main bathrooms were cleaned and painted with inspiring messages and artwork encouraging kindness and the school’s core values.

Parents worked for hours over the weekend sanding and giving the bathrooms a deep clean to prepare the canvases for artwork.

“We wanted to make the kids bathrooms a cleaner and nicer place to be, to make their school a little brighter,” said parent organizer Amy Drago.

A group of volunteers and members of the Winthrop Community Service Club, under the guidance of adviser and fifth grade teacher Jennifer O’Brien, decided that this would be a wonderful and unique way to give back o the school.

“It was really fun when we were working together to see what we could accomplish,” said fifth grade student Cate Kavanaugh a member of the Community Service Club. “Painting was a great experience. As fifth graders it was fun to leave a mark on the school.”

Each of the bathrooms feature encouraging quotes to remind all students that they are valuable and worthwhile. The entrances were adorned with phrases including” “Never give up” and “Kind is cool.”

“It’s important that people know that they make a difference, and that’s why we painted inspiring quotes on the doors,” said Jill Frawley another fifth grade member of the club who took part in the project. “I was happy that we could come together as a school and work on this great project.”

Inside the bathrooms, the stalls and wall continue with encouraging messages promoting the school’s core values. A reminder of the value of kindness appears throughout both bathrooms. All of the slogans and designs were submitted by students through a school-wide contest.

“What’s better than giving our kids the inspiration to be all they can be,” Drago said. “Now, instead of stark walls and institutional paint, they’ll be greeted with reminders of their potential.”

The students enjoyed the experience of giving their bathrooms a makeover and the rest of the school seems to enjoy the new designs.

“The students are so happy. They keep stopping me in the hall and asking ‘what else can we paint?” said parent organizer and volunteer Charisse Gallagher. “They have taken such pride in this project and we hope to carry it through to future plans.”

For O’Brien, who is also the Community Service Club adviser, this was certainly one of the most unique projects she has ever been a part of.

“I am so incredibly proud of the work this group of students did with this project, and all of their other Community Service Club initiatives this year,” she said. “They are an extremely motivated group of kids who look to make positive change in whatever they do.”

###