East Bridgewater Police Participating in ‘Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over’ Campaign

East Bridgewater Police Department
Scott Allen, Chief of Police
153 Central St.
East Bridgewater, MA 02333

For Immediate Release

Monday, Dec. 11, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

East Bridgewater Police Participating in ‘Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over’ Campaign

EAST BRIDGEWATER — Chief Scott Allen announces that the East Bridgewater Police Department will be increasing the number of patrols on local roads as part of the national “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” campaign.

The initiative is funded through a grant from the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security’s Highway Safety Division and will continue through the holiday season.

Police urge motorists to be mindful of the responsibility they have to protect the safety of their fellow drivers — as well as the safety of bicyclists and pedestrians — to stay off the road if they are impaired.

East Bridgewater Police will have several officers on the lookout for impaired and reckless drivers. Everyone is reminded to never get behind the wheel if they have been drinking and to never get into a vehicle if the driver is impaired.

“Our officers will be aggressively looking for drivers that are impaired by alcohol and drugs, including marijuana,” Chief Allen said. “There is never any excuse to get behind the wheel when impaired. Between family, friends, taxis and ride-sharing apps, someone will likely always be available to get you home safely.”

According to the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security, 119 people died last year due to drunk driving in Massachusetts. Marijuana or marijuana-type drugs were the most prevalent types of drugs found in drivers killed in crashes in Massachusetts from 2011 to 2015.

The East Bridgewater Police Department is joining more than 200 local law enforcement agencies across the Commonwealth, as well as the Massachusetts State Police, by enhancing its efforts to keep impaired drivers off the road.

If you are charged with operating a vehicle under the influence of drugs or alcohol, you will lose your license and could face jail time and incur the cost of additional fines and expenses.

###

 




East Bridgewater Department of Public Works Offers Winter Weather Preparation Tips

East Bridgewater Department of Public Works
John B. Haines, Director
100 Willow Ave.
East Bridgewater, MA 02333

For Immediate Release

Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

East Bridgewater Department of Public Works Offers Winter Weather Preparation Tips

EAST BRIDGEWATER — Department of Public Works Director John B. Haines would like to offer residents some winter weather and snowstorm preparation tips that will be helpful to community members and the East Bridgewater DPW this winter.

Snowfall is predicted toward the end of the week, according to the National Weather Service. As snowstorms come and go, the DPW will be working to make sure the town’s roads are clear and safe for travel.

“We want to make sure everyone gets through this winter as safely and as stress-free as possible,” Director Haines said. “We’re asking residents for their help and cooperation. As always, we appreciate your patience as we work to make the town’s roads safe before, during and after a snowstorm.”

BEFORE A SNOWSTORM:

  • Remove any personal property from the roadway and within 10 feet of the road, such as, basketball hoops, portable storage units, recycling bins, etc.
  • If possible, move your mailbox away from the road or try to fortify it to avoid the potential for damage during snow removal. Residents should be aware that the town is not obligated to repair or replace mailboxes that are damaged or destroyed during the snow removal and road clearing process.
  • Adhere to the town’s parking ban. East Bridgewater has a parking ban in place from Nov. 15 to April 15. There is no overnight street parking during that time. The ban is enforced before, during and after snowstorms. Residents could have their vehicles towed if they are not able to be moved out of the way of snow removal vehicles.
  • Notify your private plow contractors that it is illegal to push snow into the road from your property. Snow on your driveway must be plowed on your property. This prevents large snow banks from building up on the side of the roads.
  • Be aware that treatment on town roads takes place about one to three hours before a snowstorm and continues when snowfall first begins. So salt trucks will be on the roads prior to a storm.

DURING A SNOWSTORM:

  • Stay off the roads, if possible. If you must drive, always keep a safe distance from plows and sanding trucks.
  • Never pass plows or sanding trucks.
  • For those who shovel their driveways during a snowstorm, leave the last couple feet of your driveway un-shoveled. The snow will stay on a truck’s plow and not fill your driveway as it passes by.
  • If power goes out during a storm, contact National Grid to report an outage by calling 1-800-465-1212.
  • To report a gas leak, contact Columbia Gas at their emergency line at 1-800-525-8222.

AFTER A SNOWSTORM:

  • Please clear snow from any storm drains near your home to prevent flooding. Also, help the Fire Department by shoveling snow away from hydrants.
  • Do not pump water from sump pumps into the road. The water can freeze and cause a hazardous condition.
  • If possible, shovel sidewalks in front of your home.
  • Do not allow children to play in the streets when plows may be out on the roads.

###




Missing East Bridgewater Man Found Safe

East Bridgewater Police Department
Scott Allen, Chief of Police
153 Central St.
East Bridgewater, MA 02333

For Immediate Release

Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Missing East Bridgewater Man Found Safe

EAST BRIDGEWATER — Chief Scott Allen reports that a 91-year-old man, that had been missing, has been found safe Thursday night.

The East Bridgewater resident had been missing since 11 a.m. Thursday, when he left home to go to the Brockton Registry of Motor Vehicles.

Family members reported to the East Bridgewater Police Thursday evening that he did not come home and police were actively searching for him. About an hour into their search, the man was located by a family member at a West Bridgewater grocery store shortly before 7 p.m.

###




East Bridgewater Police Chief Receives Results of Community Survey

East Bridgewater Police Department
Scott Allen, Chief of Police
153 Central St.
East Bridgewater, MA 02333

For Immediate Release

Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

East Bridgewater Police Chief Receives Results of Community Survey

EAST BRIDGEWATER — Chief Scott Allen is pleased to announce that the East Bridgewater Police Department recently received the results of a community survey and that the responses are overwhelmingly positive.

The voluntary report is part of Chief Allen’s ongoing effort to develop a strategic plan for the department.

“As we look ahead to the future, it’s important for us to know what the community thinks of the job we’ve been doing, and where residents think we need to improve,” Chief Allen said. “While I was thrilled to see the survey results, we can always do better and will always work to improve. This evaluation is a great starting point that will help to guide us in our approach over the next several years.”

The 16-question survey was developed with the assistance of the Bridgewater State University Department of Criminal Justice and was used to measure community interactions and attitudes towards the East Bridgewater Police Department. The paper-based survey was delivered to every household in town with their water bills earlier this year.

Of the nearly 5,000 that were distributed, 452 were returned with responses.

The responses were then analyzed by Professor Shea Cronin and graduate student Shayne Finn at the Boston University Criminal Justice Department, within the Department of Applied Social Sciences.

The data shows that about 97 percent of the respondents feel that East Bridgewater is a safe place to live, are comfortable with calling the police if they need assistance and would share information about a crime to the police.

In addition, 97 percent of those surveyed wrote they are confident in the abilities of the department to serve the community and 94 percent agrees that they are satisfied with the way the department responds to emergencies.

Something that Chief Allen also finds promising is that 84 percent of respondents acknowledge that Plymouth County has a serious opioid problem and 69 percent are aware of the town’s opioid addiction treatment and prevention program, E.B. Hope.

The surveys went out in June and were done being collected in October. Boston University came back with their results of the analyzed data earlier this month.

While only about 10 percent of the surveys that were sent out were returned back with responses, there is still important information that can be gleaned from the data, Cronin said.

“These types of community surveys typically don’t have high response rates to begin with. The numbers we saw in the data collected are on-par and certainly higher than other kinds of community surveys from similar size departments and similarly situated communities,” Cronin said. “This general, broad-based community survey can give you a snapshot of how the average member of the community feels about the police and their interactions with the police.”

Chief Allen said they are just beginning their self-evaluation of the department and will continue to seek the opinions of the community members they serve.

“This was just the first step. We are planning on doing more outreach and looking to get additional feedback through officer initiated contacts. We will be engaging community groups, business owners and students starting at the beginning of next year,” Chief Allen said. “We truly want to gauge where we stand with our residents, so we can best serve our community.”

###