Bedford Police Participate in Law Enforcement Torch Run

Bedford Police Department
John J. Bryfonski, Chief of Police
55 Constitution Drive
Bedford, NH 03110

For Immediate Release

Friday, June 3, 2016

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 603-792-1350
Email: [email protected]

Bedford Police Participate in Law Enforcement Torch Run

BEDFORD, N.H. — Chief John Bryfonski is pleased to announce that the Bedford Police Department participated in this year’s Law Enforcement Torch Run to benefit their local Special Olympics team.

Left to right: Captain Daniel Douidi, Officer Patrick Gilligan, Officer James McMillen, Sgt. Kevin Bowen, Officer Eli Krause, and Sgt. Devon Kimball.
Left to right: Captain Daniel Douidi, Officer Patrick Gilligan, Officer James McMillen, Sgt. Kevin Bowen, Officer Eli Krause, and Sgt. Devon Kimball.

Nine officers from the Bedford Police Department ran the route on June 1, which started at the Merrimack/Bedford town line and ended at Bedford High School. Each officer who participated donated $25 to the cause. Participants were met at the finish line by fellow department members, police cruisers, and members of the Bedford Bobcats Special Olympics team.

The Bedford Police Department has participated in the torch run for over a decade. In addition to this race, the department also takes part in an initiative where officers can donate money in order to grow out their beards for charity.

“I am proud of our department for the enthusiasm for which they support the Special Olympics,” Chief Bryfonski said. “Our officers work with charities year-round in order to better the lives for those in our community and beyond.”

For more information about Special Olympics or how to get involved with Bedford’s fundraising efforts, please contact the Bedford Bobcats.

About The Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics:

The Law Enforcement Torch Run is a year-round fundraising and awareness building program, designed to give members of the law enforcement community the opportunity to support Special Olympics athletes who live, work and compete in their local communities.

In 1981, Wichita, Kan. Police Chief Richard LaMunyon saw an urgent need to increase awareness and support of Special Olympics, so he started the program, which was quickly adopted by the International Association of Chiefs of Police. What began simply as escorting the Flame of Hope to the Opening Ceremonies of the summer games, winter games, and all other athletic competitions, turned into one of the largest grassroots fundraising programs in the organization. Today, all 50 states and more than 35 countries actively participate in the LETR program.

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